Does Hinchley Wood Station Have Barriers To Critical Thinking

Britain was battered by gales gusting to 95mph overnight that downed trees and damaged buildings - but the Met Office insisted the winds were not severe enough to warrant being named as an official winter storm.

Forecasters sparked confusion by saying the weather system had not been named because it happened at night and therefore had a lower impact on the country.

Motorists  were faced with disruption in the north with 'persistent and heavy snow' causing standstills on major roads at rush hour after a weather warning was upgraded to severe.

Storm-force gales of 93mph were recorded at Capel Curig Saws in Wales today, while gusts reached 72mph at London City Airport and Liverpool this morning.

The extreme weather Britain is experiencing today is not directly caused by Storm Fionn, which has now passed and is making its way across to the rest of western and northern Europe.  The remnants of Storm Fionn is creating low pressure across the UK, bringing severe gales of up to 95mph and heavy snow in the north.

Today's weather bomb has not been named, after just falling below the criteria needed for a named storm. In France, where it is affecting the north of the country, it has been called Storm David and in The Netherlands and Germany it's been called Friederike. 

The next one in the UK is due to be called Storm Georgina, but the Met Office insist there is no sign of that in the next few days. 

Pictures of fallen trees, blocking roads, emerged from across the country, including in Newport and Leicester (pictured)

Motorists are being warned to stay off the roads today amid fears cars could again become stranded as parts of the UK are also hit by further 'persistent and heavy snow'. Pictured is the A19, near Hartlepool this morning

At least 30 vehicles are stuck on the A19 northbound, near Hartlepool, as heavy snow showers hit the region

Two lorries are seen stuck on the A19 northbound near Hartlepool, as heavy snow showers hit the region this morning

The roof of a three-storey townhouse has blown off in Coventry overnight. No injuries have been reported from the incident

At least 30 vehicles are stuck on the A19 northbound, near Hartlepool, as heavy snow showers hit the region

Severe gales of 93mph were recorded at Capel Curig Saws in Wales today, while gusts reached 72mph at London City Airport and Liverpool this morning

Police are at the scene on the A19 but there is no sign on any movement due to snow ploughs not being able to get through

The Dartford River crossing is closed this morning due to strong winds causing traffic chaos on the M25, A2 and A13

Met Office forecaster Oli Claydon told MailOnline: 'In the UK we assess the the impact of disruption on the roads, railways and things like that, before naming a storm.

'This can often be determined by the time of day and how much it is likely to affect people. In Ireland, however, it is measured by wind speeds or volume of rain, snow.

'We share the same names with Ireland, so although Storm Fionn didn't technically meet our criteria, the next one will be Georgina.' 

At least 30 vehicles were stuck on the A19 northbound, near Hartlepool, as heavy snow showers hit the region. Police arrived at the scene but there was no sign on any movement for a while due to snow ploughs being unable to get through.

The Dartford River crossing was closed this morning due to the strong winds. causing traffic chaos on the M25, A2 and A13.

The roof of a three-storey townhouse has blown off in Coventry overnight. No injuries have been reported from the incident.  Pictures of fallen trees blocking roads, emerged from across the country, including in Newport and Leicester. 

National Rail reported widespread weather-related delays, including disruption caused by a train hitting a tree near Lower Sydenham in south-east London, and another service colliding with a fence on the line near Sheerness-on-Sea in Kent.

All Southern Rail services into London have been affected by weather incidents. Southern tickets are being accepted on London buses between Uckfield and Lewes - Tunbridge Wells, on Southeastern services between Tunbridge Wells and London, and on Southern services via Haywards Heath.  

Passengers were warned of delays and cancellations across routes in areas including Weymouth, Bournemouth, Southampton, Portsmouth, Guildford and London Waterloo.

The problem also damaged signalling equipment at Milford, Surrey, blocking lines, and power supply equipment at Hinchley Wood. 

A tree also fell onto the line in the Deal area of Kent, while a freight train struck two sheds that had blown on to the railway between Newtown and Welshpool in Wales.

Trees blew over, blocking roads on Lynn Rd in Ely and Longford Road in Newport as the remnants of Storm Fionn passed through

In a series of tweets outlining the problems, National Rail said level crossing barriers between Chester and Wrexham had been damaged by high winds, with replacement road transport running between Chester and Shrewsbury.

Flights between London City Airport and Amsterdam and Frankfurt have been cancelled, as the continent was also affected by bad weather conditions.  

UK Power Networks said more than 5,000 customers were affected by power cuts in the Geat Yarmouth area with hundreds more homes impacted across the east of England.

TOP 10 GUSTS TODAY

93mph Capel Curig Saws

78mph Aberdaron

76mph Lake Vyrnwy Saws

74mph Liscombe

74mph Wittering

74mph Aberporth

72mph Valley

72mph London City Airport

72mph Pembrey Sands Samos

72mph Liverpool Airport 

Met Office Spokesman Charlie Powell said the worst of the blustery conditions was over, adding: 'In the last couple of hours the wind speeds have already started to come down significantly.'

Emergency services across the country received calls about weather-related incidents.

West Midlands Fire Service said no one was injured when a brick gable was blown off a house in the Stoke Heath area of Coventry.

Pictures posted on Twitter by crews at the city's Foleshill fire station showed debris on the ground near the three-storey property.

Derbyshire Police received a large number of calls regarding fallen trees blocking roads. 

During the night, temperatures dropped at low as minus 7C (19F) in Loch Glascarnoch while snowfalls continued to be topped up.

Eskdalemuir in Dumfries and Galloway recorded 36cm of lying snow, while Spadeadam in Cumbria, which escaped much of the snow on Wednesday, had 23cm, with up to 20cm on Wednesday night alone.

The Met Office amber weather warning of snow and ice ended at 5am and Police Scotland have downgraded their advice to 'high risk'.

They said there is a high likelihood of disruption and delays on the roads.

Superintendent Calum Glenny said: 'Despite some difficult weather conditions in the Dumfries and Galloway area which caused some disruption, the weather was not as severe as was first forecast.

'Thankfully, a significant number of motorists heeded the warnings which had been issued to avoid travelling on the roads and I'd like to thank them for doing so.'   

Dramatic images show a pile of bricks lying at the bottom of the £145,000 property in Stoke Heath, Coventry after the gable end fell off in 70mph gusts

A three-storey town house was left with its roof torn off after being battered by the fierce winds of Storm Fionn.

Dramatic images show a pile of bricks lying at the bottom of the £145,000 property in Stoke Heath, Coventry after the gable end fell off in 70mph gusts.

Fire crews were called to the house in Burroughs Close at around 5.15am. It's believed that the family who live inside the property were asleep at the time but suffered no injuries.

Police officers remained at the scene this morning to secure the area.

Mowa Errabou, 21, was inside the property when the incident happened, and said: 'Our first thought was that it's going to keep collapsing.

'We heard strong winds throughout the night but we didn't think it would go this far. We kept hearing a few garden gates shut hard, but we weren't expecting that.

'When we came outside we just saw the damage and thought, 'wow, thank god it happened at night time'.

'We were thinking of converting the attic into a room not long ago, but thank god we didn't.'

Tweeting the image, Foleshill Fire Station said: 'Red Watch Foleshill securing area around 3 storey town house, entire gable end which has blow [sic] off in Stoke Heath, Coventry.

'Luckily no injuries. Be careful out there today.' 

Meanwhile, damage to overhead power cables blocked lines between Colchester and Ipswich, and Birmingham and Redditch.

Poor weather conditions also delayed journeys to and from London's King's Cross station after an object was caught in the overhead electric wires between Peterborough and Stevenage.

It comes after mountain rescue teams were drafted in to check on drivers stuck in their vehicles overnight yesterday when snow and ice brought the M74 in Lanarkshire, Scotland, to a standstill.  Up to 15in (39cm) of the white stuff hit Dumfries and Galloway as heavy snow showers struck the country - and a further 8in is expected in some parts today.

Forecasters have issued a fresh amber 'be prepared' warning of heavy snow for southern Scotland and northern England today, with disruption and cancellations expected to rail and air travel. 

Extreme weather across Britain is NOT Storm Fionn

The extreme weather Britain is experiencing today is not Storm Fionn, which is making its way across the North Sea to Europe.

The remnants of the storm is creating low pressure across the UK, bringing severe gales of up to 95mph and heavy snow in the north.

Today's weather bomb has not been named, after just falling below the criteria needed for a named storm. In France, where it is affecting the north of the country, it has been called Storm David and in The Netherlands and Germany it's been called Friederike. 

The next one is due to be called Storm Georgina in the UK. 

Before it is named, the combination of both the impact the weather may have, and the likelihood of those impacts occurring, is measured.  

A storm will be named when it has the potential to cause an amber 'be prepared' or red 'take action' warning

A storm will be named when it has the potential to cause an amber 'be prepared' or red 'take action' warning.

Other weather types will also be considered, specifically rain if its impact could lead to flooding as advised by the Environment Agency, SEPA (Scotland) and Natural Resources Wales flood warnings. 

Therefore 'storms systems' could be named on the basis of impacts from the wind but also include the impacts of rain and snow.

When the criteria for naming a storm are met, either the Met Office or Met Éireann (Ireland) can name a storm.

When the criteria for naming a storm are met, either the Met Office or Met Éireann (Ireland) can name a storm

Met Office forecaster Oli Claydon told MailOnline: 'In the UK we assess the the impact of disruption on the roads, railways and things like that, before naming a storm. 

'This can often be determined by the time of day and how much it is likely to affect people. 

'In Ireland, however, it is measured by wind speeds or volume of rain, snow.

'We share the same names with Ireland, so although Storm Fionn didn't technically meet our criteria, the next one will be Georgina.'

Dozens of schools have been closed in parts of Scotland, while public transport has been disrupted by the weather. There are also fears some rural communities are at risk of becoming cut off and left without power.

All schools in the Scottish Borders were shut yesterday along with 200 in Northern Ireland, while commuters across Britain were warned of treacherous conditions following the arrival of Storm Fionn over Ireland.

Fionn became the sixth named storm of the season on Tuesday night after smashing Ireland and causing disruption to parts of the UK. 

Police are also warning against any travel after a weather warning was upgraded to severe. 

A Met Office forecaster told MailOnline: 'The worst affected areas will be the Scotland - England border. 

'Southern and far north parts of Scotland could get 1in (3cm) to 3in (8cm) of snow and up to 20cm in higher parts.' 

Scotland's transport minister Humza Yousaf told MSPs at Holyrood that following a new Met Office amber warning for Wednesday evening, Police Scotland were upgrading their travel warning from stage three to a stage four.

He said: 'That in practice means that all travel should be avoided on those parts of the trunk road affected by the amber warning, namely south and south-west Scotland for the duration of the amber warning.'

Police Scotland closed parts of the M74 in Lanarkshire in both directions due to wintry conditions for a number of hours overnight. The road later reopened.

Elsewhere a runaway lorry slid down a snowy street then crashed into a fence on Tuesday morning in Glenmavis, North Lanarkshire.

Witness Niki Blackhall, who filmed the incident, said: 'The men in the truck got out to help the crashed cars and the truck slid away. 

A mountain rescue team helped motorists early this morning who were trapped on the M74 in Lanarkshire in wintry weather

A man walks in snowy conditions in Oxspring, near Barnsley, South Yorkshire, this morning

More than 200 motorists were stranded overnight on the M74 as heavy snow and ice caused treacherous conditions today

'It hit our wall. I'm just glad nobody was injured and the wall stopped the truck from sliding down the hill, as the outcome would have been a lot worse.'

Mountain rescue teams were drafted in to check on drivers on the M74 overnight, many of whom were stuck in their vehicles for several hours.

Transport Minister Humza Yousaf has apologised to those stranded in their vehicles overnight. 

This MagicSeaweed graphic shows the wave swell coming into Ireland today (from midnight to 9pm) as Storm Fionn hits

This graphic shows the wave swell yesterday, with the black area showing a swell of up to 50ft approaching the Irish coast

Sam Sykes, a surveyor from Biggar, South Lanarkshire, said he was stuck on the M74 for around 12 hours - from 6pm on Tuesday until around 5.30am on Wednesday.

The 25-year-old was travelling from Dalry in Ayrshire to Biggar after work.

He said: 'The length of time, the cold and the uncertainty of when it would start again was the worst part.'

Mat Jackson, 29, a product manager with Siemens, arrived home in Manchester at around 11.30am on Wednesday - having left Glasgow at 3.20pm on Tuesday. 

Trucks back up at Red Moss truck stop off the M74 today after motorists spent the night stranded in Crawford

Brigid Stitt prepares to go sledding in the snow in Belfast today as Northern Ireland was hit by school closures

Heavy snow hits Scotland for the second day causing travel chaos, with many cars stuck at Abington Service Station today

A snow-capped Gold Hill in Shaftesbury, Dorset, this morning - the road made famous by the Hovis bread advert in 1973

Heavy snow hits Scotland, causing travel problems with cars facing tough conditions today in Kirkliston, West Lothian

Weather warnings have been issued for most of Britain today as heavy snow hits Kirkliston in West Lothian

Trixie the dog stands in the snow in Kirkliston, West Lothian, as more than a foot of the white stuff fell in parts of Scotland

The Dumfries and Galloway Virtual Operations Support Team helped motorists stuck in the snow in Scotland today

Mountain rescue teams and fire crews helped drivers stuck in their vehicles in Dumfries and Galloway this morning

Vehicles make their way through heavy snow in Midlothian near Edinburgh today as motorists face tough driving conditions

Drivers help to push a vehicle back on the road after snow made road conditions difficult in Midlothian near Edinburgh today

Snow blankets the grounds of the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the Queen's official residence in Edinburgh today

Bleak windy conditions are pictured at 'The Abbey' near Hay on Wye in Herefordshire today

A snow plough clears snow on a slip road next to the M74 after motorists spending the night stranded in Abington

Hinchley Wood railway station is a railway station in the centre of the compact suburban village of Hinchley Wood in Surrey, England. The station is 14 mi 4 chains (22.6 km) from Waterloo and opened in 1930 after the New Guildford Line first passed through the area in 1885.

It is the northernmost station on the line, following which the line merges into the four-track South Western main line and is outside of the Transport for London area.

Design and amenities[edit]

The station has a hardstanding island layout linked by footbridges from each side of the line. Its layout and simplicity constrasts with older stations further down the line such as Claygate, the next station. The centre platform tapers as tracks curve more to the north after the station, the London-bound track is on a flyover west of Surbiton station enabling grade segregation — fast trains on the main line's middle, fast tracks are not affected by trains entering the slow track from this line.

A modern ticket machine, Help Point and waiting room (open when the station is staffed) exist. The station is staffed from Monday to Friday between 06:30 and 11:00 and covered by Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) at all times. Electronic displays provide updates as to scheduled trains. The station is immediately outside of the area covered by the London Travel Card Zones (and Oyster readers). Buses running on the north/south minor road east of the station are in the London transport schemes, principally the K3 service.

History[edit]

See also: New Guildford Line and Hinchley Wood

The station was first opened on 20 October 1930 by the intersection of the Kingston Bypass.[1] At the time the Bypass was the A3 London-Portsmouth Road. The site is approximately half a mile south of Hampton Court (Branch Line and New Guildford Line) Junction where these opposing lines join the South Western main line. The line was opened on 2 February 1885.[1] Electric service applied from the outset as it was withdrawn during World War I, to be reinstituted along the route from 12 July 1925, before this station opened.[2][1]

Since built, operators have been successively:

  1. Southern Railway (SR)
  2. British Railways (BR)
  3. Network Rail with services franchised to South West Trains.

Services[edit]

South Western Railway operate the services (transport of passengers) on the New Guildford Line which includes the station.

In both directions, trains call at the station every 30 minutes during peak and off-peak hours; the half which run to Waterloo call at Surbiton then run fast to Wimbledon then call at all stations apart from Queenstown Road.[3] Additional, faster trains run in peak hours, skipping the stations between Surbiton and London Waterloo. Standard trains are scheduled to take 33 minutes to reach Waterloo.[3] To Guildford from this point trains call at all stops.[3]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

0 thoughts on “Does Hinchley Wood Station Have Barriers To Critical Thinking

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *